Are The Major Labels Killing Imeem? - hypebot

« Interview Series: Nancy Baym of Online Fandom | Main | The Orchard Reports Stronger Financials »

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451b36c69e201156f5b102f970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Are The Major Labels Killing Imeem?:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Charlie Dahan

Bruce, I could not agree with you more!

I equate the current state of the record (well, music) industry to the Great Depression. President Roosevelt's New Deal mantra was "Let's try everything and if it doesn't work, we'll try something else." But that wouldn't mean the constant shuffling around of services they support the labels do is the correct interpretation. Roosevelt allowed ideas to develop over time and if didn't work - next.

They need to try everything - anyone that comes in with a reasonable idea - license their content to them (we need to develop a reasonable statutory license) and let them develop over time. If they are not paying the bills, but have a lot of users, as they have your potential audience's attention, like imeem, then figure out a way to help them along for a while rather than kill them off to throw support to spotify and project playlist.

Josh Caldwell

Imeem should be broken up into different(smaller) markets - to try and make this simple look at locally ran tv commericals that are only played in a smaller market area - say a local business or mayor wants to run adds in their district - I think Imeem advertising should step it down to that level. Look at myspace how they offer advertising at a very low cost where you can target you audience. Say I have a concert I am hosting in Indianapolis, IN and I can target that market for the event I want to promote and pay a very low fee only when that advertisement is clicked on - and you can set a limit to the amount of money you want to spend.

Something offered like that with Imeem would bring in a lot more ads at a lower price but just think how they can turn a platform like this around on a larger scale and bring in money. A lot more indie record labels would use imeem if they can target smaller markets for lower costs - same with concert promoters, festivals, and other companies.

Say each state is a market (50) and then they keep their national and international markets the same. So with their 50 markets now they can run ads $100.00 a week / $175 two weeks / $350 a month + on up

So they start out small and bring in 5 ads a month in each market bringing in $350 per ad x 5 x 50 = that's $87,500 a month x 12 = $1,050,000 a year - of course they would not use these numbers and they would have to increase these numbers to even make a dent in what they want but you get the picture.

notaproblem23

this was a hate-filled illogical rant....do you consider being owed $30 million "monetizing?" ....YouTube's 'music discovery' doesn't equate into monetization either, as many popular youtube videos' songs never make any chart....the message you send is that if the labels aren't giving their product away, then they're stupid and greedy

Bruce Houghton

To notaproblem23:

I think any deal that puts music services that facilite music discovery for millions as YouTube, imeem, Pandora and others do, is bad for the music business particularly at a time when it is struggling.

The comments to this entry are closed.






SEARCH HYPEBOT

Musician & Music Industry Resources