Alt Marketing: Chromeo's Fake Craigslist Ad, Submerging Walkmans In Water Bottles
MON. NEWS BRIEF: WMG Settles Royalty Lawsuit, Spotify IPO Hints, iPad May Save Downloads & More

Lovematically's Creator Gets Real Love From Fake Likes And You Can Too!

Lovematically-logoBuying fake likes is a bad, bad thing. It's bad for all of us. It's almost as bad as being on #TeamFollowback. But giving fake likes? That's ok, right? It makes people feel good and then they might just give you some love in return. That's what the creator of Lovematically found when he automated the fake liking process. But time is running out. If you don't go get Lovematically now, you may miss this once in a lifetime opportunity to find real love and happiness in a dark, dangerous, unloving world.

Why You Shouldn't Buy Fake Likes

At this point in history there are plenty of reasons that buying or creating fake social media followers and likes is a bad idea:

They cost you money and undermine real fanbase building.

They make you look like a faker.

They can cause problems for innocent people.

Why I Want You To Buy Fake Likes

So why would I want you to buy fake likes?

Here's the math:

We now live in an attention economy.

That means that everyone trying to get attention is in competition with each other even if I write for Hypebot and you blog about socks.

And that means that if you use fakery and I can successfully avoid being targeted by fakery, then you'll fall behind in the attention economy if you buy fake likes.

And that means I'll be the winner. Yay!

But What If You Give Fake Likes Without Hurting Others?

It's true that getting a few fake likes is unlikely to hurt you because you're probably getting a lot of those already from your online "friends." So why not give a few yourself. You'll probably get some back and, more importantly, you'll help make the digital world a happier place.

Lance Ulanoff describes what happened when he started using Lovematically to give others fake likes. It didn't seem to go so well for him but think about it, he was running an experiment to provide fodder for a blog post.

Your intentions, on the other hand, are much purer than that. You just want to be loved and realize that the best way to get love is to give love.

Here's What Lovematically's Founder Discovered

Your experience is likely to be much more similar to that of Lovematically's creator:

"Lovematically is a platform that automatically likes every single post that passes your Instagram feed."

"I built it 3 months ago, and since then, I’ve averaged more than 30 new followers per day, totaling to just over 2,700 followers since inception. Since then, I’ve also noticed the reciprocal love coming in. Pre-Lovematically, my posts would average 35 likes. Now, I routinely hit the triple-digits for Likes."

"But what has floored me, were the real world reactions that resulted from Lovematically..."

"Walking down Crosby Street last week, a guy I didn’t recognize hollered at me 'Yo, you’re killing it on insta – keep it up!' That would have never happened before."

"After that, I got a text back from a friend who was a bit perturbed with me that said, 'Ah, it’s fine, you’ve been giving my photos lots of love. I forgive you.'"

"I was also invited to at least three different parties, including one that helped me make a particularly good impression on a date..."

"Now, to revisit the drug analogy, every drug dealer makes his cut. As a result of all the people that I reinvigorated stale relationships with by simply liking their photos via Lovematically, my company received around half a million dollars worth of leads and RFPs."

Half a million dollars worth!

Why are you still reading this? Go give fake Instagram likes now while the giving's good!

Besides, what could go wrong?

More:

Hypebot Senior Contributor Clyde Smith (Twitter/Facebook) is currently relaunching All World Dance. To suggest topics about music tech, DIY music biz or music marketing for Hypebot, contact: clyde(at)fluxresearch(dot)com.

Comments