Bandsintown_For Artist_Banner_6-11-19-01-01

Study Takes Critical Look At Music Recommendation
RIAA Executive Responds To Limewire $105M Settlement Controversy

Top 5 Ways To Fail On Twitter

image from www.google.com This guest post comes from Dave Cool, the new Blogger In Residence at musician website and marketing platform Bandzoogle

Most artists and bands now use Twitter to promote their music and connect with their fans. But like with all promotional tools, there are certain things you should avoid doing. I’ve searched through literally thousands of artist accounts on Twitter and noticed some alarming trends. Here’s a quick Top 5 things that could cause you to lose your fans on Twitter:

1. Don’t respond.
Twitter isn’t just to talk at people, it’s meant to be a conversation, so don’t ever leave a fan hanging. If they’ve asked you a question or commented on something you’ve said, respond as soon as you can.

2. Only promote yourself.

If your entire Twitter feed is made up of tweets like:

  • “Come to my show tonight!”
  • “Buy my album!”
  • “Check out my music!”

Chances are, your fans are going to tune out. Yes, you need to let people know if you’re playing a show, or where to buy your music, but not all of the time. Instead, focus on connecting with people by responding to their tweets, asking questions, or by talking about things that interest you. You never know how those little things in life will help you to connect with your fans and strengthen your relationship with them.

3. Use the same content on Twitter as on Facebook.
Although there is inevitably going to be some cross over, make sure that you are putting out some different content on Twitter than you are on Facebook. If it’s always the exact same, then why should people follow you on Twitter? And if you’ve synced your Twitter & Facebook accounts, use something like selective tweets so that only some of the content goes to both accounts. Take advantage of the possibility of longer updates on Facebook and use Twitter for more frequent updates and constant fan interaction.

4. Tweet too much.
If you’re updating your Twitter feed every 2 minutes with mundane details about your daily life, chances are, people are going to stop following you. A handful of updates everyday is enough, so if you start tweeting several dozen times per day and start losing followers, it might be time to scale back a little bit.
 
5. Rarely Tweet.
And last but not least, if you’re not active on Twitter, then don’t expect your fans to keep following you. You’ll need to constantly keep in touch with your fans to hold onto them and to grow your following. Even updating your feed just once a day will help to give fans a reason to stay in touch with you on Twitter.

Comments