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Discover The UK Indie Music Biz via The AIM Journal

Aim-logoThe Association of Independent Music is a trade organization established in 1999 that represents all levels of the UK's indie music industry from individuals to large labels. Though AIM does focus on the UK, they also produce material of use to folks in the States, for example, The AIM Journal that currently appears twice a year with articles of interest to any business-oriented indie artist.

The Autumn 2011 issue of The AIM Journal was recently released and it's available as a free download as are previous issues. Articles include:

Smash & Grab in London

Simon Saunders of "micro record label" Exploding Chicken Records recounts his experience selling digital tracks on Beatport, having his first Japanese music release scuttled by the earthquake and his successful release of an Android app that is causing him to consider "dropping all download stores and focusing purely on the app as a way to distribute music".

How to build an artist website

Tony Morley of The Leaf Label shares his perspective on the essential components of a band's website. The label's site is well worth a look as are the interesting range of releases on offer.

A Guide to Making Money from Cover Songs

Making money (and making moves) with cover songs is a topic that is dear to my heart though I haven't written much about it. Alex Holz of RightsFlow looks at tactics employed by a variety of musicians such as recording cover songs that are not otherwise available online, that are available only on albums or that take advantage of being associated with well-known artists via search results.

Of course, RightsFlow is U.S.-based and the topics covered by The AIM Journal point to the similarities of indie music concerns in the States and the UK. However, along with some refreshing Brit humor, such publications often offer a different perspective. In addition, keeping up with developments abroad helps American musicians and business people avoid the Ugly American syndrome, no disrespect to Simon Bob Sinister and the lads!

Via linkmaster Adrian Fusiarski of Eastbourne, East Sussex.

Hypebot contributor Clyde Smith maintains his freelance writing hub at Flux Research and blogs at All World Dance and This Business of Blogging. To suggest topics for Hypebot, contact: clyde(at)fluxresearch(dot)com.

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